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Generation III
RubyTitle
Title Screen of Pokémon Ruby
Debut March 19, 2003
Pokémon 386
Main games Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald
Region introduced Hoenn
Remakes FireRed and LeafGreen
Contains remakes of Generation I
Battle arena games Colosseum, XD

Generation III, also sometimes known as the advance or advanced generation, is the third set of Pokémon games released, and is described by some to be a "resetting" of the series.

Centering around Pokémon Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald on the Game Boy Advance, released in 2002 and 2004 respectively (2003 and 2005 outside of Japan), Generation III broke from the continuous storyline that had been established between Generation I and Generation II, opting instead to move players to the Hoenn region, an island region disconnected from Kanto and Johto. The games themselves are incompatible with the previous two generations as well, initially causing many complaints due to the unavailability of many popular Generation I and II Pokémon in Ruby and Sapphire. This problem was remedied, however, between the release of Hoenn's paired versions and third version, with remakes of Generation I's Pokémon Red and Blue appearing as Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen on the Game Boy Advance, as well as Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness on the GameCube.

Details in the Hoenn- and Kanto-based games hint that the storyline of Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald is contemporaneous with that of FireRed and LeafGreen (and due to this, contemporaneous with Generation I as well), placing Generation III three years before Generation II and Generation IV, themselves contemporaneous. It is unknown where the storylines of Pokémon Colosseum and Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness fall in the timeline, being five years apart from each other but making no reference to their time period relative to any of the main series games.

Advances in gameplay

Through its incompatibility with Generation I and Generation II, Generation III enhanced the Pokémon world the most yet, bringing about the most changes to the world of Pokémon. The advances include:

  • The addition of 135 new Pokémon, the most added since Generation I (at the time of its release), bringing the total to 386. Many new Pokémon have previously unseen type combinations, while two of them—Wynaut and Azurill—are related by evolution to older Pokémon.
  • Two new forms of Unown are also introduced.
  • The addition of 103 new moves, bringing the total to 354.
  • Pokémon may now have one or two of 77 different Abilities, special attributes in addition to types and moves which can change the tide of battle and affect out-of-battle gameplay.
  • The Pokémon Storage System has changed from a text-based interface to a full-color graphical user interface. Boxes, while remaining at 14, now have 10 extra spaces, allowing for storage of 140 additional Pokémon (for a total of 420 Pokémon).
    • It also now allows additional Pokémon to be captured without the need to change the active box of the PC, with the game now automatically sending newly captured Pokémon into a separate box rather than preventing the player from capturing anymore Pokémon until the active box which is full is changed for one that isn't.
  • The introduction of Pokémon Contests, where Pokémon show off their style in one of five Contest conditions, with Contest stats enhanced by Pokéblocks. Through this and other methods Ribbons can be won for Pokémon, which they will retain when transferred to later games.
  • A brand-new region, Hoenn, with its own set of eight Gym Leaders and Elite Four. The player characters are also different from the previous games.
  • Seven new Poké Ball variants, replacing those introduced in and exclusive to Johto.
  • In addition, the type of Poké Ball a Pokémon was caught in is now displayed in the summary page.
  • New villainous teams, Team Aqua and Team Magma, whose focus is on capturing the Legendary Pokémon Kyogre and Groudon, respectively.
  • Weather can now be found on the field and activate at the start of battle, while one more, hail, has been added.
  • Double Battles, where both sides use two Pokémon at a time, are introduced.
  • All handheld Generation III games have a framerate of 60, allowing for smoother animations.
  • Link trades and battles are made possible between Japanese and international releases due to the use of a worldwide character set. Due to the fact that online trading was introduced only in Generation IV, however, most are not made aware of this.

Major alterations from Generation II

  • A complete overhaul of the Pokémon data structure; Pokémon now have an individual personality value which can range up to a number above four billion. Abilities and natures, also newly introduced, are determined based on this value, as is a Pokémon's gender, while the IV system has been overhauled for greater variance (0-31 rather than 0-15 as it was before). Shininess is now based on a calculation between the personality value and Original Trainer's Trainer ID number and secret ID number with the same rarity.
  • An overhaul of the Berry system introduced in Generation II: old Berries rejected in favor of Berries which grow individually as plants and can be picked and planted elsewhere. The Berries are now named after real life fruits instead of their "basic" names from the previous generation. The effects of the first ten new Berries are similar to the ten Generation II Berries.
  • Each Pokémon has its own status screen sprite, for ease of use in the party screen or PC.

Further additions in FireRed and LeafGreen

  • Wireless communication between games (requires adapter boxed with FireRed and LeafGreen).
  • The ability to move multiple Pokémon in the PC at once.
  • The Sevii Islands, a collection of nine islands that contain many Pokémon otherwise only found in the Johto region.
  • Items are now visually represented with sprites.

Further additions in Emerald

Alterations from Generation II

  • The function of the built-in clock was greatly reduced. There are no cosmetic changes during different times of day and Pokémon appearances are not affected by time. Also, the day of the week is no longer tracked.
  • The seven Poké Balls made from Apricorns, along with Apricorns themselves, are unavailable in Generation III.

Regions

Starter Pokémon

Ruby, Sapphire, and Emerald

FireRed and LeafGreen

Colosseum

XD

Pokémon Introduced

Below are the Pokémon introduced in this generation:

252Treecko
Treecko
253Grovyle
Grovyle
254Sceptile
Sceptile
255Torchic
Torchic
256Combusken
Combusken
257Blaziken
Blaziken
258Mudkip
Mudkip
259Marshtomp
Marshtomp
260Swampert
Swampert
261Poochyena
Poochyena
262Mightyena
Mightyena
263Zigzagoon
Zigzagoon
264Linoone
Linoone
265Wurmple
Wurmple
266Silcoon
Silcoon
267Beautifly
Beautifly
268Cascoon
Cascoon
269Dustox
Dustox
270Lotad
Lotad
271Lombre
Lombre
272Ludicolo
Ludicolo
273Seedot
Seedot
274Nuzleaf
Nuzleaf
275Shiftry
Shiftry
276Taillow
Taillow
277Swellow
Swellow
278Wingull
Wingull
279Pelipper
Pelipper
280Ralts
Ralts
281Kirlia
Kirlia
282Gardevoir
Gardevoir
283Surskit
Surskit
284Masquerain
Masquerain
285Shroomish
Shroomish
286Breloom
Breloom
287Slakoth
Slakoth
288Vigoroth
Vigoroth
289Slaking
Slaking
290Nincada
Nincada
291Ninjask
Ninjask
292Shedinja
Shedinja
293Whismur
Whismur
294Loudred
Loudred
295Exploud
Exploud
296Makuhita
Makuhita
297Hariyama
Hariyama
298Azurill
Azurill
299Nosepass
Nosepass
300Skitty
Skitty
301Delcatty
Delcatty
302Sableye
Sableye
303Mawile
Mawile
304Aron
Aron
305Lairon
Lairon
306Aggron
Aggron
307Meditite
Meditite
308Medicham
Medicham
309Electrike
Electrike
310Manectric
Manectric
311Plusle
Plusle
312Minun
Minun
313Volbeat
Volbeat
314Illumise
Illumise
315Roselia
Roselia
316Gulpin
Gulpin
317Swalot
Swalot
318Carvanha
Carvanha
319Sharpedo
Sharpedo
320Wailmer
Wailmer
321Wailord
Wailord
322Numel
Numel
323Camerupt
Camerupt
324Torkoal
Torkoal
325Spoink
Spoink
326Grumpig
Grumpig
327Spinda
Spinda
328Trapinch
Trapinch
329Vibrava
Vibrava
330Flygon
Flygon
331Cacnea
Cacnea
332Cacturne
Cacturne
333Swablu
Swablu
334Altaria
Altaria
335Zangoose
Zangoose
336Seviper
Seviper
337Lunatone
Lunatone
338Solrock
Solrock
339Barboach
Barboach
340Whiscash
Whiscash
341Corphish
Corphish
342Crawdaunt
Crawdaunt
343Baltoy
Baltoy
344Claydol
Claydol
345Lileep
Lileep
346Cradily
Cradily
347Anorith
Anorith
348Armaldo
Armaldo
349Feebas
Feebas
350Milotic
Milotic
351Castform
Castform
352Kecleon
Kecleon
353Shuppet
Shuppet
354Banette
Banette
355Duskull
Duskull
356Dusclops
Dusclops
357Tropius
Tropius
358Chimecho
Chimecho
359Absol
Absol
360Wynaut
Wynaut
361Snorunt
Snorunt
362Glalie
Glalie
363Spheal
Spheal
364Sealeo
Sealeo
365Walrein
Walrein
366Clamperl
Clamperl
367Huntail
Huntail
368Gorebyss
Gorebyss
369Relicanth
Relicanth
370Luvdisc
Luvdisc
371Bagon
Bagon
372Shelgon
Shelgon
373Salamence
Salamence
374Beldum
Beldum
375Metang
Metang
376Metagross
Metagross
377Regirock
Regirock
378Regice
Regice
379Registeel
Registeel
380Latias
Latias
381Latios
Latios
382Kyogre
Kyogre
383Groudon
Groudon
384Rayquaza
Rayquaza
385Jirachi
Jirachi
386Deoxys
Deoxys

Alternate Forms

351Castform-Sunny
Castform
(Sunny)
351Castform-Rainy
Castform
(Rainy)
351Castform-Snowy
Castform
(Snowy)
386Deoxys-Attack
Deoxys
(Attack)
386Deoxys-Defense
Deoxys
(Defense)
386Deoxys-Speed
Deoxys
(Speed)
Generation Navigation

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